General Question

ragingloli's avatar

When something "puts you off", it is "off-putting". Is it then not logical to say, that when something "pisses you off", it is "off-pissing"?

Asked by ragingloli (49024points) May 23rd, 2021
6 responses
“Great Question” (3points)

Should that not be a term in use?
Why is it not in the dictionary?
Are there truly any actual, always applicant rules in language?
Is language in actuality nothing but a haphazard assembly of convention, exceptions and special cases, and any and all perceived “rules” nothing but the result of linguistic pareidolia?
Are we not lying to children, when we teach them these rules, that do not exist anywhere but in our collective delusions, berating and belittling them, not only when they break these rules, but also when they follow the rules in cases where an “exception” applies?
Would it not be better to just teach them all Plankalkül?

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Answers

Zaku's avatar

Only in pun logic.

“Put off” is an expression meaning to delay.

“Off-putting” is an expression meaning unlikable.

“Are there truly any actual, always applicant rules in language?”
– Not many.

“Is language in actuality nothing but a haphazard assembly of convention, exceptions and special cases, and any and all perceived “rules” nothing but the result of linguistic pareidolia?”
– Not :“actually”, but perhaps more than it is a set of fixed and reliable rules.

“Are we not lying to children, when we teach them these rules, that do not exist anywhere but in our collective delusions, berating and belittling them, not only when they break these rules, but also when they follow the rules in cases where an “exception” applies?
– We? Teachers vary. Conventional teachers do often exaggerate, and enforce overly unforgiving and inaccurate rules in their efforts to teach some things. I’ve seen children in American public schools recently who are not even trying to learn the underlying concepts. Instead they try to learn the patterns of questions and answers they need to repeat to get passing grades.

“Would it not be better to just teach them all Plankalkül?”
– It would not.

Demosthenes's avatar

@Zaku “Put off” is an expression meaning to delay. Yes, or “to cause to dislike”, hence the adjective “off-putting”, though “delay, distract” is the original meaning but one can see how “you’re putting me off” (“you’re distracting me”) came to mean “you’re putting me off” (“you’re annoying me, you’re causing me to dislike you”).

I don’t think it makes much sense to think of “off-putting” as being constructed by means of a rule. There’s no rule that forms this word. It’s simply a one-off. ;) Compare the noun “turn-off” from “turns me off”. But there’s no such thing as a “piss-off” (actually that would probably mean a “pissing contest”).

In linguistics, rules are more helpful in terms of phonological shifts than they are with anything else. These rules are so rigid they’re often called “laws”.

Word derivations and formation of new words on the other hand are especially irregular and can’t be pinned down in terms of rules.

elbanditoroso's avatar

Probably so, @ragingloli , but off-pissing has a different meaning in context, so that’s probably why it evolved the way it has.

On the other hand, this is a great opportunity for you to be a trend-setter – a vanguard of a new trend.

gondwanalon's avatar

Of course that is absolutely correct. I’ve seem lots of people off pissing.

JLoon's avatar

There’s nothing more satisfying than berating a child. And the rewards are immense.

But seriously loli – Linguistic research among aboriginal groups supposedly free of western academic constructs continues to find clear patterns of grammatical rules & conventions. Language has to be understood in order to communicate immediate experience & cultural memory.

The real process of building any language is shared by everyone who speaks it – And it’s way more fluid than your question seems to indicate. But let me know if this offs your piss ;)

flutherother's avatar

When you’re really annoyed it is more satisfying to say “that pisses me off” as it stresses the word “pisses”, more than when saying “off-pissing”. Something that is off putting doesn’t get you so emotionally riled up and doesn’t require the same strength of expression.

PS It is all highly illogical but there have been about 40 attempts at creating a logical language none of which has caught on.

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