General Question

Edna's avatar

Does anybody know what fuñenga means?

Asked by Edna (86points) 3 months ago
22 responses
“Great Question” (0points)

A person on another forum website asked: “What is the meaning of “que fuñenga”?”. This person then says: On Twitter, I came across the expression “que fuñenga”. The full tweet is: Se dañó la nevera

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Answers

Yeahright's avatar

Slang.
I wouldn’t know for sure. I’ve never heard of it.
It depends where the person using it is from.
Every variation/dialect of Spanish has their own sayings and colloquial expressions.

That said, because of the contextual clue, it probably means: Oh crap! [The fridge is broken.]

Pandora's avatar

Maybe it was a phone mistype and they meant to write fango. Fango can mean sludge or mud, so used in a slang way I can see it being used to say What a load of crap. Or Oh, shit.
Also possible that it’s not straight Spanish. Some countries in South America, like Uruguay and Paraguay, have a mixture of Spanish, Portuguese, Portuñol and Guarani, (an indigenous language from Paraguay).

Yeahright's avatar

^ I think that from fuñenga to fango is a little bit of a stretch. That can’t be a typo, it’s just two different words. No one would say ¡qué fango! It sounds weird.
However, you did convey the overall intention of the interjection.

Pandora's avatar

@Yeahright. It can be a mixed word like I said as well. Creole sounds a lot like French but there are a lot of similar words that don’t mean the same or are spelled differently than it’s spelled in French. Then of course if it’s slang, it could mean anything. Like it wasn’t till a few years ago that people started using the word Freaken, for the more foul word. The word actually comes from the word Freak so to someone else not familiar with the current culture, they would think Freaken means someone to be freaky.

Yeahright's avatar

@Edna I was looking it up and found that the original post in Twitter was Se daño la nevera. ¡Qué fuñenga! Not the other way around like you wrote in your OP.

This can suggest a slight change, and I would then translate it as The fridge broke. What a drag!

Edna's avatar

Oh! my actual whole post Got Cut off. I don’t know why Fluther.com did that. Fluther did not do that when I asked my other para/por question (asked today) before I asked this one here (also asked today).

Edna's avatar

I looked for the edit button, but there is no edit button, even though there usually is.

Edna's avatar

My whole post included every thing you saw.

Edna's avatar

Maybe it was too long, This was my actual post: A person on another forum website asked: “What is the meaning of “que fuñenga”?”. This person then says: On Twitter, I came across the expression “que fuñenga”. The full tweet is: Se dañó la nevera

Edna's avatar

Fluther did it again. I guess Fluther does like posts that are too long.

Yeahright's avatar

O.K. I understand now. It takes a little bit of getting used to posting, tagging, editing and all that good stuff. You’ll get the hang of it after a couple of times. The more you ask, the better you’ll get at it.

I enjoy your questions very much. I like how you analyze sentences and expressions and in time it will all pay off as you will improve your Spanish very much :)

Edna's avatar

Ok. Do either of you mind if I answer this person’s question with what both of you told me. This person on this forum has no answers yet and I feel bad.

Yeahright's avatar

@Pandora I understand…you got me there though. I am not familiar with that word (Freaken) at all!!

Yeahright's avatar

@Edna It is fine with me. I don’t mind it at all.

Edna's avatar

@Yeahright Thank you. This person who asked about the meaning of this word on this other forum really needs this.

Yeahright's avatar

^Do you know why?
I mean, because it doesn’t seem that important of a word. The context says it all. The only way it gets to be really really important is if you are translating something that you are being paid for.

Edna's avatar

No, I just felt really bad that this person didn’t have any answers yet, and I know how frustrating that feels.

Yeahright's avatar

There is also something you and that person, and anyone asking about meanings and translation in language needs to know is the importance of context. The more context you give the translator, the better because it gives the translator more elements to work with. Otherwise, a lot of things have to be assumed and sometimes it all goes in the wrong direction.

In this case, I would think this expression comes from the Caribbean, meaning Cuba or Puerto Rico or the Dominican Republic. There is something about the ending of fuñenga that reminds me of the way they speak.

Edna's avatar

When anyone is learning Spanish or any other language, words, anyone could come across and can’t find the meaning for, can become important if a language learner is learning with the goal of becoming fluent. This other forum is a Spanish learning forum and I had a gut feeling this person may have been frustrated that no one had answered yet

flutherother's avatar

I don’t speak Spanish but for what it’s worth Google translate gives “let it go” as the meaning of “que funenga”. The word “funenga” on its own doesn’t have a translation.

Yeahright's avatar

@Edna
Sure thing! I know the feeling, been there a few times…keep’em coming!

Yeahright's avatar

@Edna
When anyone is learning Spanish or any other language, words, anyone could come across and can’t find the meaning for, can become important if a language learner is learning with the goal of becoming fluent. This other forum is a Spanish learning forum, and I had a gut feeling this person may have been frustrated that no one had answered yet

I was rereading this post, and it reminded me that when I started out learning foreign languages and I was in the habit of looking up every single word I did not know. Since we went from reading short stories into novels and everything in between, our professors explained the little benefit that had in the big picture of things because there is so much to learn in terms of words and structures that are key to actually communicating effectively in the target language, that using ones precious time in trying to figure out what an odd word of expression like ¡qué fuñenga! exactly means is not the wisest approach to take.

Also, in the ¡qué fuñenga! case if there wasn’t much information on the Internet, and if a native speaker and linguist like me do not know it, it should tell you it is not a really important expression.

That is why I asked you if that person was working on a paid translation, in which case every word needs to be translated because you have to come up with a complete translation. But even then, if it’s not a manual or instructions for anything, I am sure ¡qué fuñenga! is totally irrelevant in most cases.

In regard to fluency, ¡qué fuñenga! will not help anyone become more fluent at all. Take my word for it.

But, sure, like I said before, we try to help everyone who might get frustrated looking for info on an expression, but not finding much information about it should give you a clue as to how frequent and important that word or expression is.

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