General Question

chefl's avatar

What are parents/guardians required to have in order to homeschool or unschool their children?

Asked by chefl (892points) 2 months ago
16 responses
“Great Question” (1points)

If they don’t need a teaching degree why not? And who can’t be a homeshooler parent or unschooling parent? What do the homeschooled and unschooled children miss out on? I can see basic arithmetic can be learned without going to school but aren’t there things a home can’t provide? What are the pros and cons of homeschooling and unschooling vs sending children to school?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unschooling

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Answers

elbanditoroso's avatar

In the US, education is a state-level responsibility, and so are the rules for it.

So there will be 51 answers to your question.

canidmajor's avatar

What @elbanditoroso said. Been there, done that, it is state monitored and regulated.

JLeslie's avatar

Yup, each state has their own rules.

I don’t think parents have to have any sort of degree in any state. Not that I’ve ever heard.

What they miss out on depends on their parents. Some homeschooled children still interact with lots of children, some go to some classes for certain subjects.

I think there is a good chance they miss out on some of the electives large public schools offer. Not necessarily because homeschooled children can’t do classes in those subjects, but because they might not have exposure to even be aware of the various subjects.

I know people who were homeschooled and then changed over to public school or private school and vice versa. All of it can be good or terrible. It really depends on the kid and the specific situation.

chefl's avatar

I still don’t know what is required from a parent. And how unschooling is allowed as a concept.
At least if the curriculum is followed, (home schooling) and the parent is a well enough educated person, ok. They must miss out on some things still, no matter which kid. But unschooling? What is that? (Edited)

smudges's avatar

You’re talking about two separate issues. Why are you asking what unschooling is?? You cited an article explaining it exactly. As for homeschooling, there is a curriculum that the parent has to follow, as the posters above have answered.

kruger_d's avatar

I think many parents who homeschool do it for what they hope their kids “miss out on” like bullying, peer pressure, woke curriculum, substance abuse, or teachings that don’t conform to their religious views.

snowberry's avatar

^^ I don’t believe that I benefited at all from the “socialization” I received during my years in school, and I would have loved to “miss out on” the bullying that I received while I was an inmate (yeah, it felt more like prison). I did manage to learn a few things but at a great price.

canidmajor's avatar

The majority of homeschoolers these days are hoping their kids will “miss out on” being slaughtered in the classroom by an AR-15 wielding guy.

It is an old myth that kids don’t get “socialized” if they are homeschool. They are not kept prisoner in their houses, there are groups that do things together, there are neighborhood kids, etc etc etc.
It’s a myth that it’s mostly religious or ultra conservative households.
There are excellent curricula available for homeschoolers, the parents/guardians/whoever don’t need degrees in education, or even outside training.
The homeschooled kids have access to resources provided by the public school system.

chefl's avatar

So I see they “miss out” on the possible mass shooting bullying etc. I can’t tell anyone that in order to be a teacher in, let’s stick to Wetern countries for now, you have to have a teaching degree? I just don’t understand. There is no way just anyone can be a teacher just because they are given the curriculum.” Even some teachers are very bad at teaching even with their degree. . I don’t understand. If it it were that parents can homeschool as long as they get a qualified teacher (volunteer or not) that would be one thing. So what is the minimum educational requirement? There must be a minimum requirement, otherwise someone who ot to elementary school can be a teacher? (Edited)

chefl's avatar

By the way a lot of people who know the stuff, are not good at teaching. They say things they use words mean, they get impatient, they are insecure, so that gets in the way. etc. (edited)

canidmajor's avatar

You are deliberately misunderstanding what I said. It is pointless to address this subject with you, you do not want actual information. I know what I am talking about, I homeschooled my child for a bit.

BTW, I have a degree in education that was not part of the homeschool process, but did enable me to judge the value of the available curricula.

I am out.

Dutchess_III's avatar

In Kansas literally nothing. I imagine they just have a couple meetings to have certain things explained. Then they send them a bunch of workbooks. That’s it.

jca2's avatar

In NY, home schooled children are still required to meet state requirements. Parents have more options about how they can achieve the requirements (for example, taking the child on a hike toward physical education goals). The problem I always saw with home schooling is that if a parent is a religious fundamentalist, the child can be indoctrinated with the relgion and not be exposed to other children and other systems that can teach him otehrwise. Also, if a child is abused, he or she is not being seen by other professionals the way kids that go out to school will be. I’m not demeaning home schooling, because I know it works really well for a lot of people.

Dutchess_III's avatar

I had a girlfriend who homeschooled. She was a Christian fundamentalist. She just literally handed them the workbooks and walked away. The girls basically taught themselves out of the workbooks.

jca2's avatar

That’s great @Dutchess_III. That would not stand in NY. I guess in KS, it’s acceptable. Either that or the girls were so smart they passed the standardized tests after looking at the workbooks.

Dutchess_III's avatar

It’s not just looking. There were lessons in the workbooks they had to complete.
How would anyone know how the student is being taught unless they physically check on them from time to time? As far as I know no one checks.

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